In Flanders Fields, the profits grow?

07Nov05

Via Accordion Guy comes the news from Colby Cosh that Pierre Bourque has discovered that the Royal Canadian Legion owns the trademark on the familiar red plastic poppy and have forbidden unauthorized posting of its image online. Like this:

Image hosted by Photobucket.com

They hate that. And in turn, all of the above hate them hating that. The Legion claims that if it doesn’t protect the image, it could be co-opted by pretty much anyone. Messrs. de Villa, Cosh, and Bourque wonder: What’s wrong with that? Shouldn’t anyone who wants to commemorate the gallant sacrifice made by our nation’s war dead be encouraged to proudly display this symbol? It shouldn’t be anyone’s property, they argue. And it’s hard to disagree.

It is the Royal Canadian Legion that has co-opted this symbol, argues Cosh, who has vowed never to pay for or wear the Legion’s precious intellectual property again. De Villa also finds this appropration inappropriate, and seconds his vow. Bourque ponders promoting the Royal British Legion’s poppy at the expense of the Canadian one, as the former group actively encourages posting of its poppy.

There is another option, though: the white poppy, which has been promoted in the UK by the Peace Pledge Union and other groups since 1933 as an alternative to the red one. I’m not sure the PPU promotes careful spelling or website building; check out the rollover on the link to the white poppy page from its index page. But as a pacifist organization, it has a worthy goal: finding an alternative to war. Although the organizers of white poppy campaigns have long been careful to establish that they do not intend to denigrate the sacrifice of the dead, they’ve long been opposed by the Legion, which charges that they do just that. It wouldn’t be surprising if the Legion’s trademark on the poppy in fact had something to do with trying to quash the white poppy campaign.

But white poppy campaigns are still going, and if you happen to be able to get your hands on one, it might be an appropriate statement to make if you’re against the commodification of the red poppy, not to mention war in general, such as the one of dubious merit that still seems to be going on in the Middle East.

Me, I’ll take whatever poppy offers me a safety pin instead of a straight one, since it’s fair to say I’ve spilled more blood trying to put on and wear conventional poppies than was spilled on all the battlefields of Europe during the conflicts of the last century. But I thought you might want to know your options.

(If anyone puts out a poppy dedicated to eliminating The War at Home, starring Michael Rapaport, I’ll take one of those too.)



6 Responses to “In Flanders Fields, the profits grow?”

  1. 1 James P. Wall

    What would the symbol for The War Of The Roses be, I wonder?I’m also thinking I might patent the Christian crucifix. Want to go halves with me in the fee?

  2. 2 Peter Lynn

    If I just buy the top crossbar, can I pay slightly less than half?

  3. 3 Matt

    Thank you! I hate that fucking show!

  4. 4 James P. Wall

    That extra nail isn’t a free “bonus”, pal.

  5. 5 Peter Lynn

    I hate it too! And yet, I seem to fall into watching it because of its time slot, which is how I know I hate it. I’m not rushing to judgment, folks! I hate it every week!

  6. 6 Dickolas Wang

    Fuck, I hate that show. It’s one thing for a show to be erosive to the moral fabric of our culture. It’s quite another thing to suck at the same time.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 25 other followers

%d bloggers like this: